Tag Archive for: children

Summer Sun Protection

Categories: BLOG, Dermatological Conditions, Health, Skin Cancer, Tips and Tricks - Tags: , , , , , , , ,

fox9-new-melanoma-increase-dr-tareen-skin-cancerMemorial Day is right around the corner – that means BBQs, swimming and days on the lake will be here before we know it!  There’s no need to compromise your fun or limit outdoor activities, as long as you know how to safely protect your skin while enjoying the Minnesota summer!

The way we look at it, there are two strategies for sun protection (we recommend combining both!)  The first is true sun avoidance; this is wearing a wide-brimmed hat to shade your face and neck, wearing sun protective clothing (more on this below!) and pulling the big umbrella over to cover your picnic table. The second strategy for sun protection is sunscreen.  There are endless options available, so it’s important to know what you should be looking for when buying a sunscreen!

The American Academy of Dermatology recommends using a sunscreen that is labeled ‘Broad-spectrum’

Tareen Dermatology SilkShade Tinted Sunscreen Dermatology Roseville Twin Cities Minnesota Zinc

SilkShade Broad Spectrum Tinted Sunscreen with SPF 30 is a great natural source of topical Zinc.

(meaning that it protects against both UVA and UVB rays – both of which can lead to skin cancer AND the features of aging skin.)  You should choose a broad-spectrum sunscreen that is SPF 30 or higher and labeled as ‘Water Resistant.’  One interesting sunscreen tidbit is that you’ll no longer see ‘waterproof’ on sunscreens – no sunscreen is 100% waterproof and finally the labeling has caught up with this fact!  We recommend applying sunscreen 15 minutes before heading outside and reapplying every 2 hours (more frequently if swimming or sweating!)  

How much sunscreen do you need?  The truth is that less than 50% of people apply enough sunscreen to get the advertised SPF benefit.  For most people, 1 ounce (enough to fill a shot glass) is the amount of sunscreen needed to cover the sun-exposed areas of the body.  Don’t forget – you even need sunscreen when it’s cloudy (the UV rays still can get to your skin!)

Baby Kamran is wearing his hat to protect him from the sun

Kamran sporting his new hat and ready for the summer sun!

What about the kids?  It is imperative that children use sunscreen regularly.  Children over 6 months of age should have a physical sunscreen of SPF 30 or higher applied every 2 hours.  Physical sunscreens use zinc oxide or titanium dioxide to actually physically block the UV rays.  These can be purchased in creams, sprays, sticks, even brightly colored formulations that your kids will love.

The sun protective clothing mentioned above is PERFECT for the little kiddos.  Instead of fighting to reapply sunscreen every 2 hours, throw on a sun protective rash guard while swimming and they won’t have to worry about creams or sprays to that area while they’re having fun.  Previously difficult to find, these sun protective clothing items can easily be found in most children’s stores – adults can find fashionable sun protective clothing for themselves at many clothing stores, as well as outdoor and sporting stores.  

Tareen Dermatology wishes you a safe, fun, and sun-protected start to your summer!  Happy Memorial Day!

Children’s Eczema: How to prevent this uncomfortable condition

Categories: BLOG, Cosmetic, Dermatological Conditions, Health, Tips and Tricks - Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

infant-eczemaEczema –a skin disorder characterized by rough, red, scaly and itchy skin — is on the rise. It is estimated that up to 20% of children in the United States suffer from varying forms of this disorder.

Recent research has given new strategies to help prevent this uncomfortable skin disorder.
1. Daily application of emollients from birth: Applying moisturizer from birth has been shown to significantly reduce the development of eczema. The benefit is due to enhancement of the skin barrier.  Researchers propose that daily application of moisturizer to all babies constitutes an effective, safe and cheap strategy to help prevent eczema.
2. Home water softeners: A study in England determined in children genetically prone to eczema, that hard water exacerbated the condition. Further studies are underway.
3. Probiotics: Maternal consumption of probiotics, especially during the third trimester, may reduce the development of eczema. The science shows that probiotics increase the development of diverse gut microbes. These microbes have a protective strategy against eczema.
Simple and effective strategies for eczema are easy to incorporate into our daily lives and can help protect the next generation against this itchy and uncomfortable skin disorder.

 

 

Winter Skin Care Tips

Categories: BLOG, Cosmetic, Dermatological Conditions, Tips and Tricks - Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

winter-skin-care-tips-minnesota-dermatologyWinter in Minnesota means lots of cold, dry air which reeks havoc on your skin. Dry skin can itch, flake, crack, and even bleed and without a change in your skin care, dry air can even make fine lines and wrinkles more noticeable.To help heal and prevent dry skin follow these few simple steps as provided by the American Academy of Dermatology.

1. Prevent baths and showers from making dry skin worse.

  • Close the bathroom door
  • Limit your time in the shower or bath to 5 or 10 minutes
  • Use warm rather than hot water
  • Wash with a gentle, fragrance-free cleanser
  • Apply enough cleanser to remove dirt and oil, but avoid using so much that you see a thick lather
  • Blot your skin gently dry with a towel
  • Slather on the moisturizer immediately after drying your skin

2. Apply moisturizer immediately after washing. Ointments, creams, and lotions (moisturizers) work by best-moisturizer-winter-skin-dermatology-mntrapping existing moisture in your skin. To trap this much-needed moisture, you need to apply a moisturizer within few minutes of drying your hands or body. We like to recommend Cetaphil and CeraVe as good everyday moisturizers for all of our patients.

3. Use an ointment or cream rather than a lotion. Ointments and creams are more effective and less irritating than lotions. Avoid scented products that can increase skin irritation. Shea butter and coconut oil also work well.

4. Wear lip balm. Choose a lip balm that feels good on your lips. Some healing lip balms can irritate your lips if they are scented. If you experience any tingling sensation, do not use the lip balm. We like to recommend Aquaphor to all of our patients.

5. Use only gentle, unscented skin care products. Some skin care products are too harsh for dry, sensitive skin. When your skin is dry, stop using:

  • Deodorant soaps
  • Skin care products that contain alcohol, fragrance, or alpha-hydroxy acid (AHA)

6. Wear gloves. Our hands are often the first place we notice dry skin. You can reduce dry, raw skin by wearing gloves. Be sure to put gloves on before you:

  • Go outdoors in winter
  • Perform tasks that require you to get your hands wet
  • Get chemicals, greases, and other substances on your hands
Wear cotton gloves under wool to avoid skin irritation and be sure to avoid wet gloves or cloths which can exacerbate eczema, cracking,  or cause sores.

7. Choose non-irritating clothes and laundry detergent. When our skin is dry even clothes and laundry detergent can be irritating. To avoid this:

  • Wear cotton or silk under your clothing made of wool or another material that feels rough
  • Use laundry detergent labeled “hypoallergenic”

8. Stay warm without cozying up to a fireplace or other heat source. Sitting in front of an open flame or other heat source can dry your skin. 

9. Add moisture to the air. Plug in a humidifier. If you can check your home heating system, find out if you have a humidifier on the system — and whether it’s working. Central heating actually blasts hot dry air throughout your home.

10. As always, continue to wear sunscreen on exposed areas of skin. Light actually reflects off the snow and can cause a severe sunburn. It is especially important to reapply sunscreen if you are performing physically extensive activities such as snowboarding or skiing when you can sweat off your SPF.
When to see a dermatologist
Your skin should start to feel better quickly. If these changes do not bring relief, you may want to contact the clinic. Very dry skin can require a prescription ointment or cream. Dry skin also can be a sign of a skin condition that needs treatment. A dermatologist can examine your skin and explain what can help reduce your discomfort.

 

The Importance of Skin Cancer Screening at any Age

Categories: BLOG, Dermatological Conditions, Skin Cancer, Tips and Tricks - Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

“I never used sunscreen when I was younger”, “That freckle has been there forever!”, “I didn’t realize I was able to have a yearly skin check with my insurance”.

Melanoma-Chart

ABCDE of Melanoma

These are comments from patients that we hear everyday in our clinic. Many patients may not know the benefits of skin screening, or what to look for when they do at home skin exams. The great majority of patients do not know that skin cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in adults in the United States today. Each year, over three million patients with be diagnosed with basal cell and squamous cell skin cancers and over 75,000 will be diagnosed with melanoma. Basal and squamous cell carcinomas are rarely fatal, although they can result in significant problems if left untreated. It is estimated that over 10,000 patients in the United States will die from melanomas in 2016.

Everyday at Tareen Dermatology, we diagnose and treat all types of skin cancers. Each skin cancer can be treated in a variety of ways, and we have resources to treat you. It is important for everyone to have their yearly skin checks and also be aware of what to look for at home.

The American Academy of Dermatology recommends full body skin exams for all adults over the age of 18, as well as for any younger patients who are at a higher risk for skin cancers. If you have a family history of melanoma, more than 50 moles on your body, or if you have had a significant amount of UV exposure you should be screened for skin cancers. During the full skin exam, your Provider will take a look at all of your skin from your scalp to the spaces in between your toes! If there are any lesions that look suspicious, they may recommend a biopsy. If you need a biopsy, the procedure is quick and easy as illustrated in this video. Biopsy results are usually provided to the patient within 14 days.

Between your in-office skin exams, it is important to also be checking your skin monthly to look for any changes. The ABCDE’s of melanoma provide a quick and easy guideline of “red flags” to look for with moles or freckles. Many patients will come in with concern about a freckle that is changing in appearance, or is suddenly painful, itchy or bleeding. If you notice that you have a lesion that matches any of the ABCDE’s, it is recommended to follow-up in clinic for a spot check.

Skin cancers can occur anywhere on the skin, and they can occur on all skin types and colors. In Minnesota we have one of the highest rates of melanoma in the country. It is important to protect your skin on a daily basis with SPF 30+ UV broad spectrum sunscreens, as well as visit your Dermatologist for a yearly check up.

If you would like to schedule an appointment for a skin exam or spot check, please call our office at 651-633-6883or email us at appointments@tareendermatology.com.

 

 

Antibacterial soaps: More harm than good?

Categories: BLOG, Dermatological Conditions, Health, Tips and Tricks - Tags: , , , , , , , ,

handwashing-banner1As we head into flu season, the benefits of washing hands with soap and water cannot be over emphasized. But what soap exactly should you be washing with?

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently issued a final ruling to pull triclosan and triclocarban from the market. The reason for the ban on the ingredients was multifactorial:
  • Manufacturers failed to show the ingredients to be safe for daily long term use
  • Manufacturers failed to show the ingredients are better than plain soap and water in preventing illness and the spread of infections
The FDA’s rule does not apply to hand sanitizers, wipes, or anti-bacterial products used in health care settings.


According to Janet Woodcock, director of the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research “In fact some data suggest that antibacterial ingredients may do more harm than good over the long term.”

 

From my perspective — as a board certified dermatologist practicing in the cold and dry Minnesota climate — I suggest everything in moderation: wash your hands with plain old soap and water, leave the antibacterial soaps for the hospital setting, and moisturize frequently to prevent dry skin and cracks that then subsequently spread infection.


Warts: Causes and Treatments

Categories: BLOG, Cosmetic, Dermatological Conditions, Tips and Tricks - Tags: , , , , , , , ,
Even Dr. Tareen's child are not immune to warts!

Even Dr. Tareen’s child are not immune to warts. But after several treatments they will resolve.

Warts are growths on the skin caused by infection with human papillomavirus (HPV). Warts have the potential to grow on skin anywhere, and their appearance can change based on where they are growing. For instance, warts on the bottom of the feet (“plantar warts”) can look more flat on the surface of the skin, whereas warts on the fingers or the elbows may grow out from the skin more. We don’t know exactly why some people get warts while others never get them. If you have had a wart yourself, you know that they can be a nuisance but will eventually go away with treatment!

There is no single, perfect treatment of warts: however, at Tareen Dermatology we have a variety of treatment options to help get rid of your warts no matter their location. Treatment consists of destroying the outer layer of skin that the wart grows on, and thus ridding the body of the wart. Most commonly a wart will first be treated with liquid nitrogen or cantharidin, which is an irritant to the skin. The cantharidin may cause a blistering reaction to gently lift away the wart from the skin below. Some patients will undergo laser treatment for their warts, which is performed in-office with no down time. The treatment to be used on your wart depends on their location and size, your type of skin, and the judgement of the Dermatologist.

 

There are also several at home options that may be used, together with in-office treatments, to help rid you of your warts in a more timely fashion. Over the counter wart medications that contain at least 17% salicylic acid can be applied directly to the wart to help destroy it. Studies have also shown that the daily application of duct tape to a wart can help get rid of them faster. Additionally,
Recent studies have shown that taking an over the counter zinc supplement can boost the immune system to help it fight off the wart virus.  If you have questions about these, or other at home treatments, our Providers would be happy to discuss them with you. 
If you have a wart, don’t worry! These are very common and, with treatment, will go away!
If you or someone you know has a wart and would like to begin treatment call (651-633-6883) or email appointments@tareendermatology.com to set up an appointment today.

 

Dr. Tareen’s Guide on Keeping Your Skin Healthy This Summer

Categories: BLOG - Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Baby Kamran is wearing his hat to protect him from the sun

Kamran sporting his new hat and ready for the summer sun!

  1. Sunscreen is your friend: It is estimated that 90% of aging and skin cancers are related to ultraviolet light. A broad spectrum sunscreen that protects against both UVA and UVB rays will keep your skin safe and young!
  1. Sometimes more is not necessarily better: The American Academy of Dermatology recommends SPF 30 and above. SPF 15 protects against 93% of the sun’s rays, while SPF 30 protects against 97%, SPF 50 blocks 98% and SPF 100 blocks 99%. Thus, some dermatologists advocate that any sunscreen over 30 just gives users a false sense of security. More important than the number on the bottle is frequent re-application (every 2-4 hours), particularly after swimming or sweating.
  1. Use Sun Smarts: It is not just about sunscreen- the judicious use of sunglasses, wide-brimmed hats, and sun protective clothing is equally as important as sunscreen. For my own children, I like rash guards and clothing that physically limits ultraviolet light on the skin. Two great affordable websites include www.coolibar.com and www.swimoutlet.com.
  1. Use an anti-oxidant: Topical anti-oxidants include vitamin C and ferrulic acid. These ingredients help neutralize free radicals -toxic compounds generated by sun and pollution. They provide an extra layer of protection from the sun and brighten the skin!

 

Kids and Skin Cancer

Categories: BLOG, Dermatological Conditions, Skin Cancer - Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,
PHOTO: Kadynce Royer

Kadynce was diagnosed with melanoma at age 2 (courtesy of ABC news.com)

A recent study indicates that children ARE at risk for the deadly skin cancer melanoma. Furthermore, the incidence of melanoma in children is on the rise.  Currently, melanoma accounts for up to 3% of all pediatric cancers and 6% of cancer cases in teens age 15 – 19 years old.  Unfortunately, the incidence is on the rise with statistics showing an increase in pediatric melanoma of 2% per year from the years from 1973- 2009.

In adults, the ABCDE criterion (asymmetry, border, color, diameter and evolving) help distinguish cancerous from benign moles.  In contrast, new research in The Journal of the American Academy  of Dermatology (JAAD) indicates that melanoma in children tends to be non-pigmented, bleeding, and rapidly growing.

Given these ambiguous criterion, the diagnosis of melanoma in children is often delayed.  In the JAAD study, 86% of children less than 10 years old had a greater than 6 month delay in the diagnosis of melanoma.  This delay is theorized to be due to atypical presentation of the pediatric melanoma.

In short, if your child has a suspicious skin lesion that you are concerned about, please alert your pediatrician or dermatologist. Dr. Tareen and her Roseville, Minnesota dermatology colleagues are happy to evaluate and treat children. Melanoma is treatable if caught early and devastating if caught late!

 

 

 

 

 

 

© Copyright 2012 | Minneapolis Dermatologist: Psoriasis & Eczema Care | Tareen Dermatology | Site by Complete Web Resources