Tag Archive for: sunscreen

Creams for Wrinkles

Categories: Acne, BLOG, Cosmetic, Dermatological Conditions, Tips and Tricks - Tags: , , , , , , , ,

how-to-use-retinoidsAs a certified dermatologist, I am often asked by patients if there are any creams to prevent and treat wrinkles. Luckily, there is! Retinols are vitamin A based derivative that increase cell turnover and help build collagen. Retinols are also great for treating blackheads/whiteheads and help reduce the appearance of some sun spots by exfoliating them away. Until three months ago, prescription strength retinols could only be prescribed by an MD, however Differin recently became a great OTC alternative. Differin, also known as Adaplene .1% gel, is available over the counter at retailers like Target, Walmart, Walgreens, etc and costs approximately $15 for a 15 gram tube.

Retinols are available in varying strength from low to strong potency. Adaplene is considered a low potency option and is great for people with sensitive skin. However, some individuals may need a stronger retinol such as Retin-A (also known as Tretinoin which is a mid potency medication) or Tazorac (the strongest available retinol). It is best to consult your dermatologist before using any of these medications to determine they are safe for you to use.

 

Even though adaplene is considered a low potency retinol, it is important to be educated before using it.

 

All topical medications should first be patch tested on a small area of skin to see how you react to them. For many people, adaplene is a strong retinol and they experience peeling, redness and irritation with overuse. It is best to start using a retinol only a few times a week. When applying a retinol, you should always follow it with a moisturizer to prevent excessive peeling or irritation or even apply moisturizer before and after the retinol, sandwiching it in between to layers of moisturizer. It is best to use a moisturizer that is noncomedogonic product, like Cetaphil or CeraVe, that won’t clog your pores. For people who don’t want the added step of applying moisturizer, the  Tareen Dermatology Retinol Repair 50 is a great option which has moisturizer added to its formulation.

Retinol-Repair-50

It usually takes two weeks for your skin to get used to a retinol and over several weeks you may be able to increase your usage to every other night or nightly. Retinols are safe to apply long term by all ages but should be discontinued when planning pregnancy.
For other information or to discuss further treatment options, call Tareen Dermatology at 651-633-6883  to schedule your appointment today.

Genetic Testing for Melanoma

Categories: BLOG, Dermatological Conditions, Health, Skin Cancer - Tags: , , , , , , ,
Melanoma Incidence Map Tareen Dermatology Roseville Minnesota Minneapolis St. Paul Twin Cities

Melanoma has a higher incidence rate in Minnesota than you would think (Photo courtesy of EPA.gov)

With the increase in melanoma seen across the world, dermatologists are looking for genetic tests to better identify those at risk for melanomas and other aggressive internal cancers.

According to Dr. Sandy Leachman, M.D., Ph.D., chair of Dermatology at Oregon Health and Sciences University in Portland “Identifying the individuals who carry a causal melanoma mutation allows these patients to be screened for other cancers, like ocular melanoma or pancreatic cancer, before those cancers develop.  It is important to catch these cancers at their earliest stages, before they become life-threatening.”

Malignant melanoma evolving from a preexisting mole

Malignant melanoma evolving from a preexisting mole

Genetic testing is advantageous for melanoma patients as it allows targeted screening and early detection activities. For example:
-Mutation for p16 (cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A) — patients with this mutation carry a 70% lifetime risk of developing melanoma and a 20% lifetime of developing pancreatic cancer.
-Mutation of the BAB1 gene increases the risk for ocular melanoma and mesothelioma (not pancreatic cancer).

 

Patients who are recommended to have genetic testing for melanoma are those that meet the “Rules of Three”
  1.  At least 3 invasive melanomas in blood relatives OR
  2.  At least 3 melanomas in a single individual OR
  3. 3 melanomas in a patient/ family member as well as pancreatic cancer/other high risk cancers within a family(defined as astrocytoma, breast, prostate, ovarian, colon)
The Rule of 3 is just a guideline- if there is melanoma in an individual + a strong family history, please let Dr. Tareen and her colleagues know as we will help navigate the complexities of genetic testing.
The gene panel that is recommended to be checked in these individuals is the melanoma panel of CDKN2A, BAP1, CDK4, MITF, and POT. If the patient meets the “Rules of Three” for melanoma, as well as other cancers then an organ specific panel for breast, colon, ovarian, pancreatic or prostate cancer should also be obtained.
Genetic counselors can order these test. They are incredibly specific and may help save lives. If you or your family members meet any of these melanoma criterion, please let us know and we would be happy to discuss with you at one of our Tareen Dermatology locations in Roseville and Faribault,  Minnesota. We will help facilitate the advanced genetic testing necessary for early detection that may impact not only you, but also your family members.

All About Sunscreen

Categories: BLOG, Dermatological Conditions, Health, Skin Cancer, Tips and Tricks - Tags: , , , , , , , ,
There are so many options when it comes to picking a sunscreen. You should always be looking for a broad spectrum 30+ SPF.

There are so many options when it comes to picking a sunscreen. You should always be looking for a broad spectrum 30+ SPF.

With our recent beautiful Minnesota weather and summer quickly approaching, we would like to take time to review with our patients the benefits of regular sunscreen use. It is important for everyone to use a daily sunscreen, regardless of your skin color or race. Regular sunscreen use can help prevent skin cancer by protecting you from the sun’s harmful ultraviolet rays. According to the American Academy of Dermatology, it is estimated that one in five Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime

So what type of sunscreen should I use?

Tareen Dermatology SilkShade Tinted Sunscreen Dermatology Roseville Twin Cities Minnesota Zinc

SilkShade Broad Spectrum Tinted Sunscreen with SPF 30 is a great natural source of topical Zinc.

  • We recommend a “broad spectrum” sunscreen, which means that it will protect your skin from both UVA and UVB rays. UVA rays penetrate deep into the skin’s thickest layer, and unprotected exposure can lead to premature skin aging, wrinkling, and suppression of the immune system. UVB rays burn the superficial layers of your skin and it plays a key role in the development of skin cancer.
  • Choose a Sun Protective Factor (SPF) of 30 or higher. While no sunscreen blocks 100 percent of the harmful UV rays, SPF 30 blocks 97%, SPF 50 blocks 98%, and SPF 100 blocks 99%. It is also important to remember that high-number SPFs last the same amount of time as low-number SPFs.
  • Look for water resistant products. There is no sunscreen that is completely water proof. Sunscreen manufacturers can use the term “water resistant” if the sunscreen has been proven to remain effective in water for a period of time, usually 40 or 80 minutes. It is important to reapply sunscreen after swimming.
  • We recommend mineral based products that create a physical barrier on the skin. Look for sunscreens containing the ingredients zinc oxide or titanium dioxide. The physical blocking sunscreen offers immediate protection from the sun, as opposed to the chemical based sunscreens that must be absorbed into the skin for 30 minutes prior to going outdoors.
  • A few brands that we like include Elta MD, Tareen Dermatology SilkShade, Vanicream, CeraVe, and Blue Lizard.

When does my sunscreen expire?

We recommend using sunscreen every day when you are outside, even during the winter and on cloudy days, as the sun emits harmful UV rays year-round. If you are using the correct amount of sunscreen every day, a bottle should not last long. That being said, the FDA requires that all sunscreens retain their original strength for at least 3 years. Some sunscreens will have an expiration date, throw it out once the date has passed. Look for visible signs that the sunscreen is no longer good, including obvious changes to color or consistency.

How much do I need to use?

Most adults need one ounce of sunscreen to fully cover the sun exposed skin. This equates to the amount you could hold in the palm of your hand. Most sunscreen bottles are 3 oz in size, so if using the correct amount, a bottle should only last for about 3 applications. Remember your neck, face, ears, tops of feet, and scalp if you have thinning hair. Don’t forget about your lips- apply a lip balm with SPF at least 15. Left sided skin cancer is more prevalent due to the sun exposure related to driving. Be sure to take extra precautions to protect your skin while driving.

What should I do if I get a sunburn?

photo courtesy on skinenergizer.com

Photo courtesy skinenergizer.com

We hope that you can avoid getting a sunburn in the first place by wearing proper protection, but in the event of a sunburn, the first thing you should do is get out of the sun and get indoors. Treating the sunburn as soon as you notice it will help to heal damaged skin more quickly. Here are some tips and tricks to soothe and heal the irritated skin:

  • Take frequent cool baths or showers to help relieve the pain. Apply a thick moisturizer to damp skin after showering to seal water into your skin. Using a moisturizer containing aloe vera or soy can help soothe inflamed skin.
  • You can apply a small amount of over-the-counter 1% hydrocortisone cream to areas that are particularly uncomfortable. Avoid applying “caine” products (like benzocaine), as these can further irritate the skin and cause an allergic reaction
  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs) like ibuprofen can help reducing swelling and discomfort associated with the burn.
  • Drinking extra water when you are sunburned helps prevent dehydration.
  • If your skin blisters, allow the blisters to heal while taking extra care to protect the sun burned skin. Avoid popping the blister, because the reason it forms is to help heal your skin and protect you from infection. If you develop blistering of the skin, it means that you have a second-degree sunburn.

Melanoma Monday

Categories: BLOG, Dermatological Conditions, Health, Skin Cancer - Tags: , , , , , ,

Today is Melanoma Monday!

moles-atypicalThis is an important day for all of us at Tareen Dermatology, as it gives us the opportunity to remind our patients that although melanoma is one of the deadliest forms of skin cancer, it can be prevented with good sun protection and easily treated when caught early. We recommend that all of our patients have what we refer to as a ‘full body skin exam’ once a year, so that we can monitor your skin for new or changing moles. If you have had a skin cancer previously, we may even recommend that you come in more frequently. During this visual exam, we identify lesions or moles on your skin that should be monitored or removed for evaluation.

So why is it so important to be monitored for melanoma (and other skin cancers)?

The reason we recommend the once year skin exam is because melanoma can be treated successfully if diagnosed early. The American Cancer Society estimates that there will be over 87,000 new cases of melanoma diagnosed in 2017 alone. Although melanoma is not the most common type of skin cancer, it is the most common cause of death from skin cancer. It is estimated that nearly 10,000 people will die of melanoma in 2017, that’s approximately one person every hour.

Malignant melanoma evolving from a preexisting mole

Malignant melanoma evolving from a preexisting mole

We don’t share these facts and statistics from the American Cancer Society to scare you; we share them with you to remind you of the importance of regular dermatology visits to screen for melanoma and other skin cancers. Your risk of melanoma can increase due to factors like genetics, history of multiple sunburns and tanning bed use; however, a recent study by The Journal of Clinical Oncology reported that the daily use of sunscreen can reduce your risk of developing melanoma by 50 percent!

What can you do at home to monitor your skin for melanoma?

Great question! Performing self-checks at home is an important way to catch a new or changing mole. If you notice something new or changing, we recommend scheduling an appointment for evaluation with one of our Tareen Dermatology providers right away.

Here is what we recommend you look for when checking your skin at home – we call this the ABCDEs of Melanoma:

ABCDE of Skin Cancer

ABCDE of Skin Cancer

A – Asymmetry

B – Border Irregularity

C – Color Variation

D – Diameter greater than 6mm

E – Evolving (does that mole look different than it did last year?)

On this Melanoma Monday, please remember to schedule your yearly skin exam at Tareen Dermatology and make a pledge to practice safe sun habits to protect yourself and your loved ones in 2017.

Sunscreen Recommendations

Categories: BLOG, Dermatological Conditions, Health, Skin Cancer, Tips and Tricks - Tags: , , , , , , , ,
There are so many options when it comes to picking a sunscreen. You should always be looking for a broad spectrum 30+ SPF.

There are so many options when it comes to picking a sunscreen. You should always be looking for a broad spectrum 30+ SPF.

The Spring Break season is upon us and as a board certified dermatologist I am often asked by my patients about what to look for when choosing a sunscreen.

When looking for a sunscreen I always recommend a mineral based product that will create a physical barrier on the skin, particularly sunscreens that contain zinc oxide or titanium dioxide. In contrast, the chemical based sunscreens (long names include avobenzone, octocrylene, ecamsule, etc.) must be absorbed into the skin to provide sun protection. Also good to know – the mineral sunscreens provide almost immediate protection while chemical sunscreens need to be applied approximately 30 minutes prior to going outside in order to be effective.

Zinc is the only ingredient that I use for my children’s sunscreen. In fact, the FDA recommends zinc as the main sunscreen ingredient for babies.

Zinc alone can be very chalky and white so it is important to look for the words “micronized.” This is a process whereby the mineral particles are made finer and more cosmetically elegant (but does not decrease the sunscreen efficacy).

A few brands that I like: Elta MD sunscreen, Vanicream sunscreen (made in Minnesota!), CeraVe AM, and of course the Tareen Dermatology SilkShade.

A few other good tips to keep your skin safe while enjoying the beautiful weather:

  • Look for broad spectrum sunscreen with SPF 30 or higher
  • Sun protective clothing and wide brimmed hats can be stylish and comfortable
  • Do not “lay out” to get a base tan: this only provides an SPF of 4 and falsely makes one think they are protected
  • UV blocking sunglasses and lip balm are imperative (ocular melanoma and lip cancers are on the rise!)
  • Remember, there are statistically more skin cancers on the left side of the face and body due to chronic sun exposure from driving- use extra protection on the left side and think about investing in UV tinted windows
  • Examine your skin head to toe once a month and see your dermatologist yearly for a skin exam

As a board certified dermatologist, I can assure my patients that NOT using sunscreen increases the risk of sun damage and skin cancer.

Winter Skin Care Tips

Categories: BLOG, Cosmetic, Dermatological Conditions, Tips and Tricks - Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

winter-skin-care-tips-minnesota-dermatologyWinter in Minnesota means lots of cold, dry air which reeks havoc on your skin. Dry skin can itch, flake, crack, and even bleed and without a change in your skin care, dry air can even make fine lines and wrinkles more noticeable.To help heal and prevent dry skin follow these few simple steps as provided by the American Academy of Dermatology.

1. Prevent baths and showers from making dry skin worse.

  • Close the bathroom door
  • Limit your time in the shower or bath to 5 or 10 minutes
  • Use warm rather than hot water
  • Wash with a gentle, fragrance-free cleanser
  • Apply enough cleanser to remove dirt and oil, but avoid using so much that you see a thick lather
  • Blot your skin gently dry with a towel
  • Slather on the moisturizer immediately after drying your skin

2. Apply moisturizer immediately after washing. Ointments, creams, and lotions (moisturizers) work by best-moisturizer-winter-skin-dermatology-mntrapping existing moisture in your skin. To trap this much-needed moisture, you need to apply a moisturizer within few minutes of drying your hands or body. We like to recommend Cetaphil and CeraVe as good everyday moisturizers for all of our patients.

3. Use an ointment or cream rather than a lotion. Ointments and creams are more effective and less irritating than lotions. Avoid scented products that can increase skin irritation. Shea butter and coconut oil also work well.

4. Wear lip balm. Choose a lip balm that feels good on your lips. Some healing lip balms can irritate your lips if they are scented. If you experience any tingling sensation, do not use the lip balm. We like to recommend Aquaphor to all of our patients.

5. Use only gentle, unscented skin care products. Some skin care products are too harsh for dry, sensitive skin. When your skin is dry, stop using:

  • Deodorant soaps
  • Skin care products that contain alcohol, fragrance, or alpha-hydroxy acid (AHA)

6. Wear gloves. Our hands are often the first place we notice dry skin. You can reduce dry, raw skin by wearing gloves. Be sure to put gloves on before you:

  • Go outdoors in winter
  • Perform tasks that require you to get your hands wet
  • Get chemicals, greases, and other substances on your hands
Wear cotton gloves under wool to avoid skin irritation and be sure to avoid wet gloves or cloths which can exacerbate eczema, cracking,  or cause sores.

7. Choose non-irritating clothes and laundry detergent. When our skin is dry even clothes and laundry detergent can be irritating. To avoid this:

  • Wear cotton or silk under your clothing made of wool or another material that feels rough
  • Use laundry detergent labeled “hypoallergenic”

8. Stay warm without cozying up to a fireplace or other heat source. Sitting in front of an open flame or other heat source can dry your skin. 

9. Add moisture to the air. Plug in a humidifier. If you can check your home heating system, find out if you have a humidifier on the system — and whether it’s working. Central heating actually blasts hot dry air throughout your home.

10. As always, continue to wear sunscreen on exposed areas of skin. Light actually reflects off the snow and can cause a severe sunburn. It is especially important to reapply sunscreen if you are performing physically extensive activities such as snowboarding or skiing when you can sweat off your SPF.
When to see a dermatologist
Your skin should start to feel better quickly. If these changes do not bring relief, you may want to contact the clinic. Very dry skin can require a prescription ointment or cream. Dry skin also can be a sign of a skin condition that needs treatment. A dermatologist can examine your skin and explain what can help reduce your discomfort.

 

The key ingredient you should look for in sunscreen is ?

Categories: BLOG, Dermatological Conditions, Skin Cancer, Tips and Tricks - Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Tareen Dermatology SilkShade Tinted Sunscreen Dermatology Roseville Twin Cities Minnesota Zinc

SilkShade Broad Spectrum Tinted Sunscreen with SPF 30 is a great natural source of topical Zinc.

Sunscreen and its ingredients are a controversial and personal topic. The media inundates us with mixed messages – at one end berating individuals for not frequently re-applying and on the other end claiming that sunscreen and its ingredients actually CAUSE cancer.

I always strive to be the voice of reason for my Minnesota patients. As a board certified dermatologist, I can assure my patients that NOT using sunscreen increases the risk of skin cancer. However, I agree that constant use of many chemicals MAY (and I stress may) be harmful.

Thus, the key ingredients that I stress for my patients are minerals, particularly zinc oxide. These mineral based sunscreens (which typically contain zinc oxide or titanium dioxide) sit on top of the skin as a shield and protectant from the sun. In contrast, the chemical based sunscreens (long names include avobenzone, octocrylene, ecamsule, etc.) must be absorbed into the skin to provide sun protection. Also good to know – the mineral sunscreens provide almost immediate protection while chemical sunscreens need to be applied approximately 30 minutes prior to going outside in order to be effective.

Zinc is the only ingredient that I use for my children’s sunscreen. In fact, the FDA recommends zinc as the main sunscreen ingredient for babies.

Zinc alone can be very chalky and white so it is important to look for the words “micronized.” This is a process whereby the mineral particles are made finer and more cosmetically elegant (but does not decrease the sunscreen efficacy).

A few brands that I like: Elta MD sunscreen, Vanicream sunscreen (made in Minnesota!), CeraVe AM, and of course the Tareen Dermatology SilkShade.

I hope this sheds light on a confusing topic and encourages more of my patients and friends to safely protect their skin with my favorite ingredient zinc!

 

Dr. Tareen’s Guide on Keeping Your Skin Healthy This Summer

Categories: BLOG - Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Baby Kamran is wearing his hat to protect him from the sun

Kamran sporting his new hat and ready for the summer sun!

  1. Sunscreen is your friend: It is estimated that 90% of aging and skin cancers are related to ultraviolet light. A broad spectrum sunscreen that protects against both UVA and UVB rays will keep your skin safe and young!
  1. Sometimes more is not necessarily better: The American Academy of Dermatology recommends SPF 30 and above. SPF 15 protects against 93% of the sun’s rays, while SPF 30 protects against 97%, SPF 50 blocks 98% and SPF 100 blocks 99%. Thus, some dermatologists advocate that any sunscreen over 30 just gives users a false sense of security. More important than the number on the bottle is frequent re-application (every 2-4 hours), particularly after swimming or sweating.
  1. Use Sun Smarts: It is not just about sunscreen- the judicious use of sunglasses, wide-brimmed hats, and sun protective clothing is equally as important as sunscreen. For my own children, I like rash guards and clothing that physically limits ultraviolet light on the skin. Two great affordable websites include www.coolibar.com and www.swimoutlet.com.
  1. Use an anti-oxidant: Topical anti-oxidants include vitamin C and ferrulic acid. These ingredients help neutralize free radicals -toxic compounds generated by sun and pollution. They provide an extra layer of protection from the sun and brighten the skin!

 

Acne Tips From Top Minnesota Dermatologist

Categories: Acne, BLOG - Tags: , ,

As the holidays approach, we are all looking to clear up acne quickly.  The best approach to treating acne is to visit your dermatologist for a complete evaluation.  There are actually different types of acne, and of course many different skin types, so each patient is treated with a unique regimen that addresses their specific needs.  Dr. Tareen, a top Minnesota dermatologist, notes that, “I often meet my patients for the first time, after they have tried many over-the-counter acne medications.  I recommend that even people with very mild acne visit a dermatologist, in order to stop acne before it becomes more severe or even causes scarring on the skin.  However, while you are waiting for that appointment, there are a few key things to keep in mind.”

Here are Dr. Tareen’s acne tips to follow at home:

  • Don’t pick or pop your pimples: Picking at your pimples can seem like a good idea when you’re looking in the bathroom mirror.  The truth is that picking your pimples can actually cause more inflammation to occur on the skin, which can make the pimples larger and cause them to stick around longer.  Instead of picking, apply a tiny dab of salicylic acid or benzoyl peroxide spot treatment to the area.
  • People with acne prone skin can benefit from using a cleanser with benzoyl peroxide once a day.  Benzoyl peroxide helps to kill the p. acnes bacteria that causes acne.
  • Using a glycolic acid or salicylic acid pad to unclog your pores after working out will help to prevent acne caused by exercising.
  • Don’t forget sunscreen! Even people with acne prone skin need to protect their skin from both UVA and UVB rays.  The truth is that some acne medications can cause your skin to be a little more sun sensitive, so its important to use sunscreen every morning and to reapply every two hours while you are outside.  Find a sunscreen labeled “non-comedogenic” or “non-acnegenic,” which means that it was studied and proven not to cause acne.

Click here to learn more about acne treatments in Minnesota.

 

The three products that I cannot live without …

Categories: BLOG - Tags: , , ,

Dear Readers,

Here is a link to a new interview that I did for the September issue of WebMD magazine – please see page 17.

http://img.webmd.com/dtmcms/live/webmd/consumer_assets/site_images/magazine/digital_issues_pdf/webmd_sept12.pdf

As I always tell my patients, there is no need to spend a great deal of time or money on your skin — a simple regimen of a mineral based sunscreen in the morning, and alternating a retinoid with an anti-oxidant (such as Vitamin C) in the evening — will leave your skin healthy, smooth, and glowing!

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